Cargo pants

My husband and one of my son want me to make them cargo pants. I recently bought Winifred Aldrich book as I had two others books of her that I had found useful (the one for children and the one for women). I was very disappointed to find that I’m on my own as to the proportions or the size and placements of the pockets, the back yoke, and so on, I know it’s part of the “design” but some guideline would be useful. Am I missing something in the book ? Do you know a place where I’ll be able to find informations about these subjects ?

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Hi! I have not made them yet but Gareth Kershaw’s book Pattern Cutting for Menswear has modern menswear patterns that includes cargo pants. I’ve found the instructions very helpful on other patterns and it shows you how to create the patterns from basic blocks. I imagine it would be easy to tailor the methods to your own preference when going through the instructions to create the pattern.

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the basic blocks on my books are good, that’s not the problem but when you come to draft the front pocket opening, you have two points A and B, and it says : draw the pocket curve… So OK, I can do this, but where do I put points A and B ? Is there a rule of thumb that tells you point A is, let say mid-point between center front and the top of the side seam ? I just don’t know where to put those points ! That’s what I’m missing. The same thing applies to the back yoke, the back pocket, and so on. I know it’s not a “seamly2D” problem but if someone could point me towards tips about those details, I would be very glad. The book you mention is a bit expensive in France (about 55€) and I have no way to find it in a library to be sure I can find the info I need. I won’t buy anymore book that will prove, afterward, to be useless. I want to be sure I can find the info I need inside it.

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Sorry I can’t speak for the book you have but hopefully someone who has it may be able to help.

The instructions in the book I have gives a description of why one is moving lines and by how much. For the cargo pants in the book the pocket is a slash pocket which starts 12 cm towards the centre front (from the side seam) and the pocket is 26 cm deep. As to why those are the lengths I imagine that is a style/functional choice.

Edit: just to add, there is a few notes in the book saying that the pocket opening should allow for different widths of the hand so I imagine you could use that as a starting point.

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I have the same problem with the Aldrich books. I just don’t know enough about where things go on the body to estimate the sizes and positions of things like pockets :slight_smile:

However, I did draft the Combat Trousers in the Aldrich book for men but I only used it to make very basic shorts for my husband. Here are the files so that you can have a look: Aldrich Mens Basic Jeans Blocks.val (39.3 KB) Aldrich Mens Jeans Basic Block Measurements.vit (770 Bytes)

What I did was… I measured the image in the book, enlarged it proportionately and then drew it in on my pattern in (more or less) the same place. It may not be 100% accurate but at least it is a guide. And, as I have said, I haven’t even created the final pattern but I did make up a quick shorts for my husband to wear while mowing the lawn and he says that they fit him beautifully. He’s hoping that I will make him the combat pants at some point :slight_smile:

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thanks for your help, it’s helpful :slight_smile:

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I took my three books (children, women and men) a notebook and try to summarize every bit of information as it’s written that you should have gone through the other books before making the plunge in men’s wear. And finaly I did exactly what you did : mesure and use the rule of three to deduct the good proportions. I have an other idea using Inkscape : I’ll scan the illustrations (they seem proportionnate) import them in Inkscape, vectorize them and then setting a known lenght and so I’ll be able to have a good idea of the actual size and placement of the litigeous pieces. I’ll let you know how it turned. For the time being, I’m working for my grand-children (Thanks be made to Seamly2D for the girls, Thanks be made to Inkstitch for the boy). But afterward, I’ll face the same dilemma… I have an ebook in french too that’s a bit more helpful but barely : I have a list of opening size according to pocket types but no tips as to where put them and so on. I think I’ll have to make a lot of tinkering before being able to have something that’s suits me. “Heureusement que je n’ai pas les deux pieds dans le même sabot” (I don’t know if you have a similar idiom in English, it means that I can find a solution by myself, that I don’t lack in initiatives).

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You can download a PDF copy of Gareth Kershaw’s book Pattern Cutting for Menswear from Patternmaking for menswear - PDF Drive

There are other books there which you might also find useful in the future, especially Patternmaking for Fashion Design by Helen Joseph Armstrong.

Lots of luck with the cargo pants.

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I greatly appreciate you directing me there. I can see what’s inside the book and as it’s very complete, I think I’ll purchase the paper version of it though it’s a bit expensive, it’s worth it :slight_smile: I’m now suspicious towards books that promise a lot but give litlle. Those books can quite only on online shops be found, rarely in brick and mortar shops as they are too specific for “common” readers. So you have to buy “blindly” what’s promised to you hoping you won’t be deceived… So once again many thanks to you :slight_smile:

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So glad I was able to help :slight_smile:

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Hello Dear Crace

Thank you for sharing

Greetings Carine

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Hello Dear Anni

Thank you very much

Greetings Carine

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Hello and welcome, @Carine

We are a friendly forum and love to help, so if you have any questions or queries, please don’t hesitate to ask.

You are very welcome :slight_smile:

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Hello Dear Grace, thank you very much.

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